EthiopianStory Remembering #Ethiopia’s first female head of state Empress #Zewditu (1916 - 1930) on this #InternationalWomensDay https://t.co/5Vz7UtcHW7
EthiopianStory Happy Victory of #Adwa celebrations to all Ethiopians. #Ethiopia https://t.co/1qUxzrQM3E
EthiopianStory RT @crscntstrafrica: #TBT #AFRICA: Emperor of #Ethiopia Haile Selassie and daughter in law Princess Sara Gizaw during official state visit…
EthiopianStory Our flag is a symbol of our freedom, national pride and history, and it’s marked by the blood of those who died def… https://t.co/FtUayNfzZB
EthiopianStory #HabtamuAyalew and his young family have arrived in Washington D.C. today where he will begin the life-saving treat… https://t.co/27mnfOmqvY

Did you know?

 
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Empress Zewditu who ruled Ethiopia from 1916 to 1930 was the first woman head of state in the world. She was the eldest daughter of Emperor Minilik and died on 2 April 1930 at the age of 53.  Zewditu was succeeded by Emperor Haileselassie.


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Prior to Ethiopia’s Solomonic Dynasty, Ethiopia had a beautiful queen known as Queen Makida or the Queen of Sheba. She once went to Israel to visit Jerusalem and met the wise and powerful King Solomon. The queen was greeted with great hospitality in Jerusalem and King Solomon enjoyed her company. The meeting of the Queen and the King eventually resulted in an affectionate relationship and the Queen of Sheba went back to Ethiopia pregnant with Solomon’s son. The son was Minilik the first who became the first king of Ethiopia as anointed by his father, launching Ethiopia’s long line of Solomonic Dynasty. All of Ethiopia’s emperors and empresses are descendants of Minilik I – the first-born of King Solomon. The Solomonic Dynasty was founded in 1268, with Yekuno Amlak becoming the first emperor. The last emperor of Ethiopia’s Solomonic Dynasty was Emperor Haile Selassie who died aged 85 in 1975.


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Prince Alemayehu of Ethiopia, who was the son of Emperor Tewodros, died at the age of 18 on 14 November 1879 in the city of Leeds in England after being taken hostage by Briton ten years earlier. The prince was taken hostage by Briton after his father committed suicide regarding capture by an invading British army as bringing shame on himself and his country. Prince Alemayehu’s body is still kept at the medieval Windsor Castle in the English county of Berkshire.


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Emperor Haile Selassie was the first Ethiopian leader to extensively travel abroad. Among the countries he visited are: America, Brazil, Australia, Canada, China, Egypt, England, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Haiti, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Malta, Nigeria, Norway, Russia, Saudi Arabia Senegal, Sweden, Switzerland, Trinidad, the Netherlands, the Vatican and Uganda.


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One of Ethiopia's most recognized national landmarks is the world-famous rock-hewn ancient church of Bete Geiorgis located in the northern Ethiopian town of Lalibela. While the Church of Bete Geiorgis is very easily recognized for its architectural shape resembling the Cross, it actually is one of eleven churches carved out of a single piece of granite below ground level that are connected to each other by a tangled maze of tunnels. Built in the 12th century under King Lalibela, these churches attract pilgrims from all over Ethiopia several times a year.


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According the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, the original Ark of the Covenant, the object on which the Ten Commandments were inscribed, is kept at the Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion in the northern Ethiopian town of Axum.


* An Ethiopian shepherd who lived in the ninth century discovered the coffee plant in the southwestern Ethiopian town of Kefa. The shepherd was napping one day while his herd had set out to find grazing to eventually stumble across the coffee plant and its stimulant cherries. Legend has it that the herd led the shepherd to the spot where they found the coffee plant and that he helped himself to the bright red cherries as a matter of curiosity and realized their stimulant nature. The first experiment of coffee was then carried out by boiling the cherries in water and drinking the blend. Most people at that time enjoyed the stimulant nature of the plant on the grounds that it kept them alert and lively, thereby making them able to maintain wakefulness during evening prayers in this deeply religious country. This makes Ethiopia the origin of one of the world's most consumed beverages and the coffee beverage is named after the Ethiopian town of Kefa where the coffee plant was discovered for the first time.


* Ethiopia started competing in the Olympics at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics in Australia and the only sport the Ethiopian contingent participated in was cycling. The team returned to Ethiopia ranking ninth in the world.


* The script of Ethiopia’s official working language of Amharic is derived from Ethiopia’s ancient language of Geez which came to being during the 4th century CE.


* Dallol in northern Ethiopia is the hottest inhabited place on earth where an average annual temperature of 34°C (94°F) was recorded between the years 1960 and 1966.


* With more than 27 million native speakers, Amharic is the second most-spoken Semitic language in the world after Arabic.